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Temin and Co.

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"Fujifilm Addresses Accounting Problems" 

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"Hacked Twitter Account Gives McDonald’s Indigestion" 

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"Qualcomm Chips Away at South Korea Probe" 

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"Tyson Finds Itself in Game of Reputation Chicken" 

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"Delta Grounded After Computer Crash" 

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"Signet Confronts Diamond Debacles" 

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"NFL Goes for Knockout Against New York Times" 

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"OSI Fights Back In China" 

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"Tesla Slams the Brakes on Seat Belt Problem" 

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"United Airlines Faces Turbulence Amid Federal Probe" 

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 "Accounting Problems Hobble Toshiba" 

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 "Kiss-and-Tell Fears After Adult Friend Finder Breach" 

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"Ice Cream Recall Snags Blue Bell" 

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"Williams, NBC Between Iraq and a Hard Place" 

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"Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut" 

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"How Well Did Tesco Account for Itself?" 

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In the News

Temin and Company is often quoted in print, broadcast and social media on topical issues as well as industry trends.

Following is a list of links to those articles, beginning with the most recent.

President Trump Cedes Moral Leadership To Big Business

Alexander C. Kaufman, The Huffington Post, August 19, 2017

A deadly attack by an avowed white supremacist shocked the nation. The president's response came swiftly, and triggered raw emotion. Despite a sometimes strained relationship with the White House, corporate board rooms stayed silent, spared the need to weigh in.

That was 2015.

This week, chief executives at some of the country's biggest companies tossed out usual protocols and disavowed the sitting commander-in-chief after President Donald Trump refused to single out the white supremacists and neo-Nazis who rallied in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend.

Of course, distance from the leader of the ruling political party won't cost executives their jobs like it might lawmakers facing reelection in an era of hyper partisanship. At a particularly circus-like time in politics, this gives companies the ability to "become the adults in the room," said Davia Temin, a management coach and reputation consultant who worked with some of the companies whose leaders resigned from Trump's councils this week.

"Business has a planning and strategic horizon that is further out than four years or eight years or 12 years," she told HuffPost. "They can actually have a counterpoint and be the counterbalance to the short governance by tweet." [...read more]

Davia Temin Says Trump Had No Choice But to End Councils

Scarlet Fu and Julie Hyman, Bloomberg, August 16, 2017

In today's "Walk the Talk," Davia Temin, head of the crisis-management firm Temin & Co., reacts to President Donald Trump's decision to disband two advisory groups of U.S. business leaders. She speaks with Bloomberg's Scarlet Fu and Julie Hyman on "Bloomberg Markets."

To watch the interview on Bloomberg, CLICK HERE.

CEOs Rethink Alliances With White House

Vanessa Fuhrmans, The Wall Street Journal, August 15, 2017

President Donald Trump's response to the weekend violence in Charlottesville, Va., has sparked a new round of soul-searching in U.S. corporate boardrooms over whether they should keep working closely with the White House.

On Tuesday, the number of members who have withdrawn from a White House advisory council grew to five, and executives including Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Chief Executive Doug McMillon criticized the president's initial unwillingness to specifically denounce the racist hate groups that rallied in Charlottesville over the weekend.

The fallout is testing already-tense relations between the White House and corporate executives, many of whom face new pressures from employees, consumers and activists to take stands on social and political issues. At times, those issues have put them in direct opposition with a president whose pro-business agenda they are also seeking to shape.

"This is one of the toughest times for the consciences of corporate boards and corporate CEOs,'' said Davia Temin, head of Temin & Co., a reputation and crisis-management consultancy. Ms. Temin said she expects more leaders to resign their advisory posts. [...read more]

Three More CEOs Turn Backs on Trump as Merck, Intel Quit Counci

Jeff Green and Jared S. Hopkins, Bloomberg, August 15, 2017

Could America's first CEO president lose America's CEOs?

It was a question that came to the fore again Monday when first Merck & Co.'s Kenneth Frazier, then Under Armour Inc.'s Kevin Plank and Intel Corp.'s Brian Krzanich stepped down from a White House business group set up to advise Donald Trump.

While none mentioned the president, Frazier, one of the country's most-prominent black chief executive officers, quit the council as Trump was being assailed for failing to quickly condemn white supremacists for deadly violence at a rally Saturday in Charlottesville, Virginia. Frazier said he was acting on a "matter of personal conscience."

Frazier and his compatriots joined the ranks of Elon Musk of Tesla Inc., Bob Iger of Walt Disney Co. and Travis Kalanick of Uber Technologies Inc. -- executives who walked away from business panels Trump touted, taking the unusual steps of publicly distancing themselves from a sitting president.

Who's next? That's the big debate, said Davia Temin, head of the New York-based crisis-management firm Temin & Co. "This conversation is viral in boardrooms right now." [...read more]

Trump versus Corporate America: Why corporations need to be the adults in the room

BNN, August 15, 2017

Davia Temin, president and CEO of Temin and Company, joins BNN to provide perspective on CEOs leaving Trump's manufacturing council following the latest departure.

To watch the interview on BNN, CLICK HERE.

More CEOs may ditch Trump

Axios, August 15, 2017

Merck & Co.'s Kenneth Frazier, then Under Armour Inc.'s Kevin Plank and Intel Corp.'s Brian Krzanich stepped down from a White House business group (Manufacturing Jobs Initiative), per Bloomberg's Jeff Green. While none mentioned the president, Frazier, one of the country's most-prominent black chief executive officers, ... said he was acting on a "matter of personal conscience."

As for Intel's Krzanich, his Twitter account was peppered [yesterday] by pleas for him to quit the White House group.

Who's next? Davia Temin, head of the New York-based crisis-management firm Temin & Co: "This conversation is viral in boardrooms right now." [...read more]

CEO Health: Shareholders Want to Know More

Lindsay Frost, Agenda, June 26, 2017

Newly minted CSX CEO Hunter Harrison is lauded as transforming the railroad game for Canadian Pacific and several other railroad networks. Although he took his post at CSX in March, investors were tasked with ratifying the $84 million pay package it would take to keep him. While considering the vote, shareholders voiced concerns about his health after a report was leaked noting that he has to work from home sometimes and uses an oxygen tank to help him breathe.

Harrison's situation has put the question of materiality, and when and if to disclose CEO health issues, back in the spotlight. Considered the board's responsibility, making health disclosures can be a difficult decision depending on the situation, sources say.

"[When boards are considering disclosing], they are caught in this world between privacy and HIPAA [Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996] and material information," says Davia Temin, CEO of strategy and communications consulting firm Temin and Company, who has served on multiple boards. "Clearly shareholders and analysts want the information immediately, and very often CEOs who are ill want more time [before disclosing]. Different companies have threaded the needle differently and walked that thin line differently." Subscription required for full access. [...read more]

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Crisis of the Week: Fujifilm Addresses Accounting Problems

Ben DiPietro, The Wall Street Journal's Risk & Compliance Journal, June 19, 2017

Fujifilm Holdings announced that losses from accounting irregularities in New Zealand were much larger than first thought and extended to the company's Australian office-equipment unit. The announcement left some to wonder how much control the company has over its overseas units.

The company said it conducted a review and found the losses would widen further but did say it found "a problem" with controls at its Fuji Xerox subsidiary. Fujifilm said inappropriate accounting occurred in part because of commission and bonus "incentives" for managers and employees that "placed an emphasis on sales." It said six board members at Fuji Xerox would resign to take responsibility for the losses that now total around $340 million. It also docked the pay of all Fuji Xerox board members and two other senior executives.

Using Fujifilm's statements and those of its executives, the experts break down the company's crisis management performance in this instance.

"Fujifilm's public response to its 'inappropriate accounting' crisis was enough to be effective as witnessed by the fact the story lasted no more than a few days in the global news cycle," said Davia Temin. "While the company's public responses were terse, minimal and occasionally odd, they were unprecedented in their openness and disclosure." [...read more]

Navigating the United PR crisis

Amara Walker, CNNi, April 11, 2017

Amara Walker talks with public relations expert Davia Temin about United Airline's handling of their latest crisis that sparked worldwide outrage, in which a passenger was dragged off the airline when he wouldn't give up his seat on an overbooked flight, and how they can recover from the blow to their reputation.

To watch the interview on CNN, CLICK HERE.

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