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Temin and Co.

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"Gynecologist’s Actions Bring Down USC’s President" 

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"Harassment Claims Cost Wynn Resorts its Leader" 

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"NBC News Faces Questions After Lauer Firing" 

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"Equifax Hit With Massive Reputation Breach" 

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"Fujifilm Addresses Accounting Problems" 

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"Hacked Twitter Account Gives McDonald’s Indigestion" 

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"Qualcomm Chips Away at South Korea Probe" 

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"Tyson Finds Itself in Game of Reputation Chicken" 

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"Delta Grounded After Computer Crash" 

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"Signet Confronts Diamond Debacles" 

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"NFL Goes for Knockout Against New York Times" 

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"OSI Fights Back In China" 

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"Tesla Slams the Brakes on Seat Belt Problem" 

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"United Airlines Faces Turbulence Amid Federal Probe" 

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 "Accounting Problems Hobble Toshiba" 

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 "Kiss-and-Tell Fears After Adult Friend Finder Breach" 

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"Ice Cream Recall Snags Blue Bell" 

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"Williams, NBC Between Iraq and a Hard Place" 

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"Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut" 

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"How Well Did Tesco Account for Itself?" 

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In the News-Other Articles

#MeToo and the Weinstein verdict: What now for working women?

Radmilla Suleymanova, Al Jazeera, February 29, 2020

AlJazeera 2-29-20

Harvey Weinstein, the once all-powerful Hollywood mogul making and breaking women's careers, now faces up to 29 years behind bars after being convicted this week of sexual assault and third-degree rape. Dozens of women who accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct, predatory behavior and rape have yet to have their day in court. Still Monday's verdict serves as a turning point in a scandal that blew the lid off of sexual harassment in US workplaces and propelled the #MeToo movement to a global stage.

#MeToo put on blast predatory gatekeepers in media, sports and entertainment by bypassing traditional streams of reporting sexual misconduct and harassment. It inspired millions of women to share their own experiences on social media.

While the movement ignited an international conversation, gender experts say the Weinstein scandal and conviction shows just how much work needs to be done to change cultural norms that have for decades brushed off sexual harassment allegations and the women who voice them.

Public awareness is spreading though. UN Women estimates that between 2016 and 2019 #MeToo and its global sister hashtags made over 36 million social media impressions.

And while the number of sexual harassment allegations has fallen compared with when Weinstein was first accused, it is still higher than before #MeToo began, according to crisis and reputation strategy firm Temin & Co.

"#MeToo 2.0" should at least give women the tools to deal with abuse, the company's founder Davia Temin told Al Jazeera. "Women, when it happens, document it, tell your friends, or a lawyer because when allegations come to light you are going to be asked for proof," Temin added. [...read more]

Harvey Weinstein Is Convicted of Rape in Case That Sparked #MeToo

Patricia Hurtado and Rebecca Greenfield, Bloomberg, February 24, 2020

Bloomberg 2-24-20

Harvey Weinstein was convicted of rape and a criminal sexual act, more than two years after allegations against the former Hollywood power broker sparked the #MeToo movement.

Weinstein faces a five- to 25-year sentence for the criminal sexual act and as long as four years on a third-degree rape count. He was acquitted of rape in the first degree and charges of predatory sexual assault that could have resulted in a life sentence.

The 67-year-old movie producer, who is due to be sentenced on March 11 and plans to appeal, heard the verdict without expressing any emotion in an otherwise silent courtroom -- though he then turned to his lawyers and said, "But I'm innocent, I'm innocent, I'm innocent. How can this happen in America?" one of them said after court.

Since the allegations against Weinstein were first widely reported, some 1,400 powerful people have been publicly accused of harassment, abuse or assault, according to Temin, the crisis consultants. Many suffered professional consequences of one kind or another. The crisis consultancy Temin & Co. puts the current number of Weinstein accusers at 111. [...read more]

Harvey Weinstein Sex Abuse Settlement Is Not an ‘Oh, Wow’ Number

Jeff Green, Bloomberg, December 11, 2019

Bloomberg 12-11-19 Weinstein Settlement

A tentative $47 million settlement between Harvey Weinstein and dozens of his accusers is "flawed," advocates say, but still an important vindication.

"I think it's just on the margin of being seen as serious, but it certainly does not deliver the message that $100 million would deliver, or $200 million would deliver," said Davia Temin, founder of crisis consultancy Temin and Company, which has tracked more than 1,400 people accused of harassment and other misbehavior since the Weinstein allegations surfaced. "This isn't some 'oh, wow' number."

Considering the scope of the allegations and their impact, Temin and others expected a higher figure. [...read more]

Have We Reached the Point of #MeToo Malaise?: The Broadsheet

Claire Zillman and Emma Hincliffe, Fortune, The Broadsheet, June 19, 2019

Fortune-Broadsheet-1

New data from crisis consulting firm Temin and Company finds that last month saw 12 high-profile allegations. That's the lowest monthly total since claims against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein ignited the #MeToo movement in the fall of 2017 and a dramatic drop from a peak of 143 last October.

In explaining the trend, Davia Temin, the consultancy's CEO, cited a few factors: a backlash against the movement, more sophisticated campaigns to counter accusations, and improved corporate resources that are placating the aggrieved. [...read more]

Sexual harassment allegations are down sharply since Harvey Weinstein first accused

Megan Cerullo, CBS News, June 19, 2019

6-19-19 CBS News

Good news, perhaps, for victims of harassment in the workplace. The number of highly publicized #MeToo accusations dropped to the lowest level last month since peaking in October 2017, when former Hollywood studio chief Harvey Weinstein was first accused of sexual harassment. That's according to the "#MeToo Index," which tracks what it calls "high-profile" accusations of sexual misconduct in entertainment, media, politics and other employment sectors.

Twelve such accusations surfaced in May, down from 143 in October 2017, according to Temin and Company, a corporate reputation management and public relations firm that maintains the #MeToo Index. Temin attributes the steep drop in public accusations to a combination of factors, including companies' improved internal reporting systems and procedures for handling complaints.

"Organizations have become more savvy, so when they hear complaints they are quicker to investigate, address and handle them in some way, as opposed to ignore them," Davia Temin, the firm's CEO, said. [...read more]

Sexual Harassment Reports in Steep Decline After #MeToo Peak

Jeff Green, Bloomberg, June 17, 2019

6-17-19-Bloomberg-Me-Too-Steep-Decline

Public accusations of corporate misbehavior and harassment have fallen to their lowest level since October 2017, when allegations against movie producer Harvey Weinstein sparked the #MeToo movement.

Twelve complaints generated media coverage in May compared with a peak of 143 last October, according to data compiled by crisis consultant Temin and Co.

There are lots of reasons the pace of allegations has slowed, said Davia Temin. The initial outpouring included decades worth of historical revelations, clearing a kind of backlog. The news cycle has also moved on, and companies have gotten more sophisticated in the way they manage both bad behavior and negative PR. [...read more]

The Doyenne of ‘Courage’ in Crisis

Bridget Paverd, PRSA, May 13, 2019

Davia-Temin-The-Doyenne-of-Courage-in-Crisis

I spent a morning in New York City with Davia Temin last week.

While respectful of the knowledge of others, and always open to learning, there are just so many accomplished professionals that I am seldom blown away meeting a specialized superstar.

Davia is an exception.

Davia and I discussed crisis as we see it now, in 2019.... A world of 'alternative facts' and the MeToo movement. We shared war stories. I wanted to write down every word she said – she was so generous with advice. We talked about the value of the truth. And of listening. Of "hearing" both clients and audiences and moving our clients into recovery as quickly as possible.

Davia Temin has shaped, and continues to define, contemporary crisis communication. All of us who work in reputation management have been influenced by her leadership. Even those who don't know her name follow her best practices. Barely a month goes by that she is not quoted in major media. [...read more]

Temps at the top

Nancy Marshall-Genzer, Marketplace, April 23, 2019

Marketplace

Right now, the Trump administration has acting heads at the Defense Department, Homeland Security, the Small Business Administration, and the Office of Management and Budget. By the time you finish reading this story, there could be more. And that's just the way President Trump likes it, as he told CBS's "Face the Nation" in February.

"I like 'acting' because I can move so quickly," he said. "It gives me more flexibility."

It's the kind of flexibility that's increasingly on display in the private sector. Intel appointed Robert Swan as interim CEO last June. Last month, Wells Fargo announced that its general counsel, C. Allen Parker, would become interim CEO and president. J. Crew, Comscore and Herbalife have also brought on interim CEOs this year.

Davia Temin coaches interim executives. She says they have a tough job.

"You've got the title — almost," she said. "You've got the responsibility — almost. You are acting as if you are the CEO, but when it comes to long-term strategy and planning and action and vision and mission, you don't have that nod." [...read more]

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The Fixer

Dora Mekouar, VOA Connect, April 12, 2019

Davia Temin is featured in this Voice of America Connect story with reporting by Dora Mekouar. In this video she shares the story behind her woman-owned crisis and reputation management firm and the different tools firms and people can use when faced with catastrophe. [...read more]

Board of Managers Profile: Davia Temin on #MeToo, Business, and Finding Her Path

Bayliss Wagner, The Phoenix, April 1, 2019

4 1 19 The Phoenix Board of Managers Profile

Board of Managers member Davia Temin '74 arrived at Swarthmore the year that the college first operated without some of the parietal rules it had held since its founding in 1864.

"It was a time of great change for women, for men, for the sexes. You know, right before my class, you couldn't have the door shut with a member of the opposite sex in your room. We all made fun of it. There was this rule that you had to have three feet on the ground, meaning, you can't get in the bed. Well, there's the floor. Who's gonna count?"

Temin is assertive and cavalier — in other words, she is everything society trains women not to be but praises men for. She ranks her time at Swarthmore as one of the most, if not the most, influential experience in her life, alongside a near-fatal car crash that left her with "a huge amount of metal" in her leg and her taxi driver dead in 2005 and an encounter she had with the Dalai Lama that helped her decide to leave Wall Street. And she is emphatic about gender equity.

Temin advocates for what she calls "top-down" change as a trustee or board member of several governing boards such as the Girl Scouts Board of Trustees, Harvard Kennedy School Women's Leadership Board, Columbia Journalism School's Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Business and Journalism, WomenCorporateDirectors, and the Columbia University Women Creating Change Leadership Council.

"Companies often say, 'well there are not enough women in the pipeline to be able to move them up," she said. "They've been saying that for twenty years. There are a lot of women in the pipeline...you just have to look in untraditional places." [...read more]

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