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Temin and Co.

Thought Leadership

Specialists in marketing through ideas, information, and insight, Temin and Company turns clients' intellectual capital into true thought leadership.

We also seek to practice what we preach.

Temin and Company's own thought leadership includes white papers, yearly client letters and podcasts, published articles, a Forbes.com column - Reputation Matters, Huffington Post and American Banker articles, and appearances in other news articles and broadcasts.

Further, Davia Temin is a frequent public speaker and moderator – for clients, their own client events, and their "high potential" training programs. She also presents regularly at CEO conferences, and has developed a range of "Crisis Game" role play simulations to prepare CEOs, Boards, and client companies for real-life crisis situations.

Getting Intelligent About Artificial Intelligence: 6 Ways Executives Can Start

Davia Temin, Bruce Molloy, Jayanth Kolla, Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, December 8, 2017

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This past June, Fortune Magazine asked all the CEOs of the Fortune 500 what they believed the biggest challenge facing their companies was. Their biggest concern for 2017: "The rapid pace of technological change" said 73% of those polled, up from 64% in 2016. Cyber security came in only a far second, at 61%, even after all the mega hacks of the past year.

So, what does "technological change" entail? For almost all Fortune 500 CEOs, it means, in part, artificial intelligence. And, as we wrote in our piece yesterday on Forbes.com, "Forget The Hype: What Every Business Leader Needs To Know About Artificial Intelligence Now," AI is on the lips of almost every global CEO and Board of Directors.

But apart from the Big 8 technology companies – Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon, IBM, Baidu, Tencent, and Alibaba – business leaders, especially of earlier generations, may feel they don't know enough about AI to make informed decisions.

GettingIntelligentAboutAI

We made a series of 6 suggestions of how board members and C-suite executives can begin to understand this brave new world of AI, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning. And, after being asked by a number of people to break that list out for them, we include it, slightly modified, here. [...read more]

Forget The Hype: What Every Business Leader Needs To Know About Artificial Intelligence Now

Davia Temin, Bruce Molloy, Jayanth Kolla, Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, December 6, 2017

iStock-673766092-1

Artificial Intelligence – it's on the lips of the leaders, and on the 2018 agendas of the board meetings, of almost every global company today. Directors and operating executives alike know, or think they know, that this "new electricity" is going to be the next transformative force of our world. To ignore it now could be fatal to their long-term competitive position, not to mention survival.

AI-powered companies that know what they are doing -- primarily born in the Internet and mobile eras -- have not only gained tremendous advantage in improved efficiency and increased profitability, they have literally changed the competitive landscape of successive industries. And they are continuing to do so, as they venture into new fields, challenging a whole new set of incumbents that are not AI "natives." (Witness Google's Launchpad Studio's focus on healthcare AI startups, and Alphabet's Waymo autonomous cars, to name only two.) [...read more]

How Boards Should Handle a CEO Scandal

Chief Executive, October 24, 2017

It used to be that a founding CEO could be excused all manner of misbehavior by his or her board, as long as it was kept quiet and the bottom line was not negatively impacted. In my 20 years as founder and CEO of a boutique crisis management firm, I have dealt with well over 60 cases of CEO dismissal, and an equal number of case where the CEO did not get dismissed. It used to be that the board might either tolerate bad behavior, or publicly support a CEO while privately chastising him relentlessly. Regardless, he or she would stay.

More recently, however, given the outsized attention to serious CEO misbehavior, boards really have little choice—they must react, and act, quickly and decisively. In the brave new world of 24-hour news cycles and social media commentary that transits the globe at the speed of light, no CEO is invulnerable or—once found to be guilty of ethical violations—irreplaceable.

Boards need to keep ahead of the public humiliation and loss of reputational equity caused by major CEO misbehavior or malfeasance. If they deny, or stall, they run the risk of ruining their company and turning themselves into the targets of shareholders' and the public's bloodlust. [...read more]

Equifax: A Category 5 Cybersecurity Crisis Storm. Chances Are It Will Hit You

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, September 9, 2017

You would really think that by now companies in crisis could get it right the first time.

But no, as Equifax announced its epic Category 5 Crisis — the cyberhack of 143 million consumers' social security numbers, drivers' license numbers, birthdates, addresses and credit card numbers affecting at least 44% of the American population — after stalling over a month to stop the hack and prepare for the onslaught of a public announcement, clearly got the apology algorithm all wrong anyway. Did they think no one would notice?

From a tepid apology from CEO Richard Smith — totally incommensurate with the size of the crisis — to a completely botched announcement of remediation, tying use of their free credit monitoring to forfeiting the right of a trial and mandating arbitration, they just got everything wrong.

Whenever you come out of the gate wrong in a crisis — either minimizing the problem, putting forth a totally tone-deaf message, trying to pull a fast one on your consumers by limiting your liability, or retaining some of your breezy marketing messages in the face of category 5 devastation — you court the fury of your customers, the public, regulators and investors.

Here's what Equifax has done wrong — so far. [...read more]

The Only Adults In The Room: Why Business Leaders Rose To The Challenge And Led The Country

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, August 27, 2017

For a supposedly slow month, August has seen quite a lot of action in the C-Suites and Boardrooms of America. As CEOs bailed out of the White House Industry Councils, protesting President Trump's insufficient condemnation of events in Charlottesville, they filled a void — taking on a national leadership role whether they wished to or not. No one from the Cabinet or Congress was rising to the occasion, so in the midst of national crisis, business leaders proved themselves to be the only adults in the room.

Ever concerned about achieving favorable tax legislation, maintaining a stable economy, and paving the way for global expansion, corporate America has always had a major stake in how Washington operates. In some administrations relations have been more strained, and in others more collegial. But rarely have corporate leaders felt the need to exit en masse from White House-sponsored advisory councils, such as happened this month. [...read more]

Dear Uber, Here Are 11 Ways You Can Fix Your Culture To Support Women Right Now

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, June 18, 2017

To rephrase Madeleine Albright: There is a special place in heaven for men — and women — who help other women. But for Uber, and so many other organizations, their cultures are in need of an essential transformation before they even begin to find their place in the firmament.

Of course Uber is not the only company to sport a "bro" culture that can be antithetical to women executives' presence, progress, and well-being. They're just one of the most flagrant.

So, as Arianna Huffington and Eric Holder began to publicly reign in the executive office, and board, I began to think of what it would really take for Uber, and other organizations, to immediately empower, support and profit from the women in their workforce. I decided that this, drawn from over 25 years' experience as a coach, reputation manager, and CEO dedicated to promoting women and girls' leadership at every level, would be the topic of my remarks: 11 Ways To Support the Women in Your Organization and Life. I am pleased to share it with you today. [...read more]

How United Became The World's Most Hated Airline In One Day

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, January 18, 2017

It's no longer crisis as usual for United Airlines, or anyone else. Live social media posting has changed what you can get away with in a crisis -- forever.

It used to be that if an airline made as monumental a mistake as United Airlines just did by causing a paying customer who had done nothing wrong to be dragged off a plane screaming, bloodying him up along the way in front of all his fellow passengers, they might still have gotten away with it.

After all, on a plane, passengers were basically incommunicado, so people couldn't have protested easily, and they might not have been believed, especially if the airline denied it or called it an "overreaction." The populace tends to believe its leaders in these situations, if compelling evidence to the contrary doesn't exist. It rather makes one wonder about how many times such a debacle has happened before, and just not been caught on video.

But today all that changed. Live footage of the assault of an innocent passenger by security personnel was captured and immediately posted on social media around the world, instantly making United one of the most hated companies in the world. [...read more]

10 Leadership Blind Spots That Can Trigger Business Crises In 2017

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, January 18, 2017

When you look closely at what triggers crises in organizations, you often see that there is a major leadership oversight or blind spot that has allowed the crisis to exist in the first place – and then grow, unrecognized, until it's too late. Just as many leaders want to be perceived as trustworthy in a rapidly changing environment, leaders themselves need to be aware of who and what they are trusting. Misplaced trust is a clear precursor to trouble.

As businesses look toward the coming year, here is a deeper dive into common crisis triggers, so that management teams and boards can recognize hidden risks and danger zones within their organizations. [...read more]

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Ancient Wisdom For The New Year: The 36 Chinese Stratagems For Psychological Warfare

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, January 2, 2017

2017 is the perfect time to learn some new leadership and coping strategies for the battles ahead -- in business, politics, war, and life.

Last year we found out just how wrong we can be in our collective assumptions -- and how much we don't know about what others are thinking, or doing behind the scenes.

Whether it is because the Internet allows us to only hear from people who think like we do; polls relying on "Big Data" can be wrong; we are convinced of the wisdom of the crowd, even when the crowd is being manipulated; or we are just plain gullible -- it is time to realize that leaders need to listen to and learn from those who think differently from them. [...read more]

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