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Temin and Co.

Thought Leadership

Specialists in marketing through ideas, information, and insight, Temin and Company turns clients' intellectual capital into true thought leadership.

We also seek to practice what we preach.

Temin and Company's own thought leadership includes white papers, yearly client letters and podcasts, published articles, a Forbes.com column - Reputation Matters, Huffington Post and American Banker articles, and appearances in other news articles and broadcasts.

Further, Davia Temin is a frequent public speaker and moderator – for clients, their own client events, and their "high potential" training programs. She also presents regularly at CEO conferences, and has developed a range of "Crisis Game" role play simulations to prepare CEOs, Boards, and client companies for real-life crisis situations.

BankThink How to save a bank's reputation

Davia Temin, American Banker, June 28, 2018

American-Banker

From #MeToo to lending to gunmakers, from compliance issues to cyberhacks, from questionable marketing practices to persistent gender inequality — political, economic, and social issues are all directly impacting bank operations and reputations like never before.

Moreover, the rules appear to be changing in real time. Where the "Boom Boom Room" was an aberration that took a long time to be taken seriously and then addressed, today almost any whiff of sexual harassment will find bankers on the curb in a nanosecond, as the public's tolerance for such behavior is plummeting.

Yet new studies are telling us that even after a crisis of major proportions, most companies' share price returns to normal valuation in months. (Note how quickly Equifax rebounded after its massive hack.)

So, what is the difference between a reputational hit that ends up being just a blip, and one that becomes an extinction level event? Following are five ways to assess your exposure. [...read more]

How The Reputation Risk Of #MeToo Is Forcing Businesses To Reevaluate Their Corporate Culture

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, May 14, 2018

Me-Too-Forbes-RM

Real #MeToo incidents in the workplace aren't happening in a vacuum. Whether they are the most egregious examples of sexual harassment and abuse, or more subtle acts of unconscious bias, they all happen within a culture that somehow sanctions them.

New Examination of Corporate Culture

That is why the reputational risks of #MeToo (we calculate that since the first Bill Cosby trial, 298 high-profile executives have been let go in the US because of sexual improprieties), as well as escalating global calls for gender equity, are sparking a whole new examination of corporate and organizational culture. What elements of culture enable abuse, or create a toxic work environment, and what elements preclude them? [...read more]

Best Board Practices in Managing Reputational Risk

Davia Temin and Darcy Howe, Risk & Compliance, April-June 2018

RC-April-June-Cover

The stakes around reputational risk have never been higher for companies – with the potential for damaging everything from market value to the ability to recruit and retain the best talent. Regulations put in place post-global financial crisis called for boards to disclose their role in risk oversight, but the explosive disclosures around cyber hacks and sexual harassment have lifted reputational risk oversight to an even more heightened level of urgency.

A key issue is how crises today are creating significant reputational impact. When a company experiences a crisis event – whether it is a massive data breach or allegations of misbehaviour in the executive ranks – the reputation of every investor, every customer and every person who gets a pay cheque from that company is at risk.

There are a number of best practices for directors when facing the highly complex and sensitive issues emerging today. Davia Temin and Darcy Howe share a number of best practices for boards, who are more involved in managing reputational risk than ever before. [...read more]

What Mark Zuckerberg Should Have Said

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, March 23, 2018

What-Mark-Zuckerberg-Should-Have-Said

You know that Marianne Williamson quote: "Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure?" Well so it is with Facebook. It turns out Facebook is far, far more powerful than any of us — even they, even Mark Zuckerberg — ever thought.

And with such awesome power comes awesome responsibility.

This week, Facebook shirked that responsibility through its terribly late and insufficient response to the Cambridge Analytica data hijacking scandal.

As a crisis advisor and coach who has crafted hundreds of what I hope are truly on-point, effective, and emotionally resonant crisis responses, here's what I wish Mark Zuckerberg had done to give the world a response worthy of a Facebook's vast global power and influence. [...read more]

A 15-Point Plan For Boards And CEOs To Eradicate Sexual Harassment In Their Organizations

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, January 17, 2018

15-Point-Plan-Graphic

As organizations wait for the next wave in the tsunami of sexual abuse charges that is rocking American business, board directors and C-suite executives are fixated not only on understanding their risk exposure, but on what they can do to get ahead of the issue.

The only solution – and the right solution of course – is for leaders of all stripes to seriously take up the challenge of quashing sexual harassment in their workplaces for good.

Davia Temin's "15-Point Plan To Eradicate Sexual Harassment In Your Organization" is an actionable, and easy-to-execute game plan for serious boards and executives. [...read more]

Poisoned Apple Antidote: 11 Ways For Apple To Recover Trust After Its Battery Slowdown Crisis

Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, December 31, 2017

The past several weeks have seen a string of mounting customer allegations against Apple, accusing the company of planning the obsolescence of its older 6 series iPhones through its last updates that limited those phones' battery power and slowed them down significantly.

After radio silence, on Thursday December 28th, Apple finally posted a plausible explanation of why the last update indeed does hobble performance, and an apology, clearly trying to contain the reputational damage it has sustained.

While that explanation is a perfectly adequate one – it is too little, too late. [...read more]

Getting Intelligent About Artificial Intelligence: 6 Ways Executives Can Start

Davia Temin, Bruce Molloy, Jayanth Kolla, Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, December 8, 2017

artificial-intelligence-concept-picture-id827157732-2

This past June, Fortune Magazine asked all the CEOs of the Fortune 500 what they believed the biggest challenge facing their companies was. Their biggest concern for 2017: "The rapid pace of technological change" said 73% of those polled, up from 64% in 2016. Cyber security came in only a far second, at 61%, even after all the mega hacks of the past year.

So, what does "technological change" entail? For almost all Fortune 500 CEOs, it means, in part, artificial intelligence. And, as we wrote in our piece yesterday on Forbes.com, "Forget The Hype: What Every Business Leader Needs To Know About Artificial Intelligence Now," AI is on the lips of almost every global CEO and Board of Directors.

But apart from the Big 8 technology companies – Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon, IBM, Baidu, Tencent, and Alibaba – business leaders, especially of earlier generations, may feel they don't know enough about AI to make informed decisions.

GettingIntelligentAboutAI

We made a series of 6 suggestions of how board members and C-suite executives can begin to understand this brave new world of AI, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning. And, after being asked by a number of people to break that list out for them, we include it, slightly modified, here. [...read more]

Forget The Hype: What Every Business Leader Needs To Know About Artificial Intelligence Now

Davia Temin, Bruce Molloy, Jayanth Kolla, Leadership, "Reputation Matters," Forbes, December 6, 2017

iStock-673766092-1

Artificial Intelligence – it's on the lips of the leaders, and on the 2018 agendas of the board meetings, of almost every global company today. Directors and operating executives alike know, or think they know, that this "new electricity" is going to be the next transformative force of our world. To ignore it now could be fatal to their long-term competitive position, not to mention survival.

AI-powered companies that know what they are doing -- primarily born in the Internet and mobile eras -- have not only gained tremendous advantage in improved efficiency and increased profitability, they have literally changed the competitive landscape of successive industries. And they are continuing to do so, as they venture into new fields, challenging a whole new set of incumbents that are not AI "natives." (Witness Google's Launchpad Studio's focus on healthcare AI startups, and Alphabet's Waymo autonomous cars, to name only two.) [...read more]

How Boards Should Handle a CEO Scandal

Chief Executive, October 24, 2017

It used to be that a founding CEO could be excused all manner of misbehavior by his or her board, as long as it was kept quiet and the bottom line was not negatively impacted. In my 20 years as founder and CEO of a boutique crisis management firm, I have dealt with well over 60 cases of CEO dismissal, and an equal number of case where the CEO did not get dismissed. It used to be that the board might either tolerate bad behavior, or publicly support a CEO while privately chastising him relentlessly. Regardless, he or she would stay.

More recently, however, given the outsized attention to serious CEO misbehavior, boards really have little choice—they must react, and act, quickly and decisively. In the brave new world of 24-hour news cycles and social media commentary that transits the globe at the speed of light, no CEO is invulnerable or—once found to be guilty of ethical violations—irreplaceable.

Boards need to keep ahead of the public humiliation and loss of reputational equity caused by major CEO misbehavior or malfeasance. If they deny, or stall, they run the risk of ruining their company and turning themselves into the targets of shareholders' and the public's bloodlust. [...read more]

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