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Temin and Co.

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"Gynecologist’s Actions Bring Down USC’s President" 

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"Harassment Claims Cost Wynn Resorts its Leader" 

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"NBC News Faces Questions After Lauer Firing" 

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"Equifax Hit With Massive Reputation Breach" 

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"Fujifilm Addresses Accounting Problems" 

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"Hacked Twitter Account Gives McDonald’s Indigestion" 

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"Qualcomm Chips Away at South Korea Probe" 

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"Tyson Finds Itself in Game of Reputation Chicken" 

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"Delta Grounded After Computer Crash" 

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"Signet Confronts Diamond Debacles" 

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"NFL Goes for Knockout Against New York Times" 

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"OSI Fights Back In China" 

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"Tesla Slams the Brakes on Seat Belt Problem" 

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"United Airlines Faces Turbulence Amid Federal Probe" 

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 "Accounting Problems Hobble Toshiba" 

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 "Kiss-and-Tell Fears After Adult Friend Finder Breach" 

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"Ice Cream Recall Snags Blue Bell" 

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"Williams, NBC Between Iraq and a Hard Place" 

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"Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut" 

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"How Well Did Tesco Account for Itself?" 

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In the News

Opinion: Facebook’s Zuckerberg had 15 minutes to respond to privacy crisis — he took four days

Howard Gold, MarketWatch, March 22, 2018

Marketwatch-Zuckerberg

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg finally broke his silence late Wednesday afternoon.

In a long and technical statement posted on his Facebook page, the CEO addressed the massive misuse of personal information in which a researcher was able to release data on 50 million Facebook users without their consent to Cambridge Analytica, a firm that worked closely with the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential election.

Davia Temin said Facebook missed its chance to shape the narrative in its favor, and Zuckerberg's statement did nothing to change that. "This is a totally insufficient response, both operationally and emotionally," she said. "Yes, it is prescriptive, yet strangely hollow, limited, unemotional, and lacking any form of apology." She added that it made Facebook look like it was "fiddling while the world is burning." [...read more]

Nike Scandal Threatens Its Image With Women at Tumultuous Time

Matthew Townsend, Bloomberg, March 22, 2018

Bloomberg-Nike

It's never a good time for companies to grapple with a scandal over sexist behavior. At Nike Inc., it's especially awkward given its ambition to target female shoppers.

The world's largest sports brand expects much of its future growth to come from selling more sneakers and gear to young women. And fresh concerns about a locker-room mentality could hurt Nike's reputation with a demographic group that it desperately needs. That risk looms over a company that saw two high-profile executives step down last week amid a broader review of misconduct.

"It's an enormous reputational risk," said Davia Temin. "We know millennials want to work for places that have a higher purpose. They are going to put their buying power in the same place."

The company is especially ripe for being deemed phony and inauthentic, she said. Unlike some other businesses caught up in the #MeToo movement -- a push to improve treatment of women, especially in the workplace -- Nike has marketed itself as a champion of female empowerment, Temin said. Anything that undercuts that image could be a brand killer. [...read more]

Institutional investors eye gun control

Ben Ashwell, Institutional Investor, March 19, 2018

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Until now, gun control in the US has only been a concern from an IR perspective in terms of faith-based investors, but the high-profile public debate since the Parkland school shooting in Florida may be changing that. Several large financial institutions have in recent weeks broken with precedent and publicly committed to engagement with portfolio companies around gun control, signaling that this may join human rights and political lobbying as a prominent social issue for investors.

Davia Temin says gun control and the anti-sexual assault #MeToo movement has shown the power of consumers harnessing social media to create a targeted movement on ESG issues. "All of a sudden on both issues we've reached a tipping point on sentiment, with what's happened on social media showing that the public's mood is changing. So the real exposure here is for boards to understand the values of their customer base and their core audience, and have their own set of values to live up to. The people who think they can just rearrange the deckchairs on the Titanic are in denial as to how serious this public reevaluation of issues is." [...read more]

Banks wrestle with sense of futility on sexual harassment

Jackie Stewart, National Mortgage News, March 12, 2018

As titans of entertainment and media resign over sexual harassment charges, many bankers argue that their industry already had its reckoning two decades ago and is largely free of the worst problems as a result. But scratch beneath the surface, and there is a lingering feeling among many that harassment is not only present, but it may actually be inevitable, based on responses to a new survey that SourceMedia, the publisher of American Banker, conducted across the banking industry, including mortgages and payments professionals.

Banks have other ways to combat sexual harassment, experts agreed. One of them is simply to reject the notion that the problem is unsolvable.

"Sexual harassment has been around for decades, centuries, probably even longer," said Davia Temin "But just because something has just reached a tipping point and is beginning to change, that doesn't mean it is inevitable. It just means change has taken a long time to come." [...read more]

Crisis of the Week: Harassment Claims Cost Wynn Resorts its Leader

Ben DiPietro, The Wall Street Journal's Risk & Compliance Journal, February 27, 2018

Crisis of the Week Wynn

Steve Wynn resigned as chairman and chief executive of casino and hotel company Wynn Resorts Ltd. this month following an article in The Wall Street Journal which, drawing on interviews with dozens of people who have worked for Mr. Wynn, described behavior that amounted to a decadeslong pattern of alleged sexual misconduct by the CEO.

The company issued a Feb. 6 press release announcing Mr. Wynn's resignation, calling him "an industry giant...[who] played a pivotal role in transforming Las Vegas into the entertainment destination it is today." Mr. Wynn said in the same release he's "been the focus of an avalanche of negative publicity" and "reached the conclusion I cannot continue to be effective in my current roles."

Wynn's board named Matt Maddox, the company's president, as its new CEO and initiated an outside investigation of Mr. Wynn's conduct but canceled it because Mr. Wynn resigned. It hired a different law firm to conduct the probe.

Three crisis-management experts analyze the responses of the company and Mr. Wynn.

"Wynn Resorts' and Steve Wynn's responses...are par for the course among organizations that choose to defend themselves and not admit wrongdoing publicly," said Davia Temin. "The exact same statements could be made by guilty and innocent alike. This throws us back to a highly advanced game of 'he said, she said.'"

"Mr. Wynn's personal responses were emotional and moving. It used to be emotional, high-valence comments were rare and could win the day. That no longer works; everyone has ratcheted up the emotionalism, until we are at a fever pitch." [...read more]

Investor Focus Shifts to Gender Pay Equity

Lindsay Frost, Agenda, January 29, 2018

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The World Economic Forum kicked off last week in Davos, Switzerland, bringing together corporate heads and political titans to discuss, among other things, how the "Me Too" movement, pressure to provide equal opportunities for women and regulations in the U.S. and abroad are driving gender pay equity further into the spotlight.

"As discussions around women and the workplace and having a harassment-free, gender-neutral kind of presence in the workplace at the highest level gets raised over and over again, hopefully every time some fixes come with that," says Davia Temin, CEO of strategy and communications consulting firm Temin and Company. "Extinguishing sexual harassment in organizations is here to stay, so with that comes a host of other issues [being addressed] — pay being one of them." [...read more]

How boards and CEOs can prevent workplace sexual harassment

Jon Erlichman, BNN, January 24, 2018

Davia Temin, president and CEO of Temin and Company, joined BNN's Business Day AM to discuss how companies can fix and prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.

To watch the interview on BNN, CLICK HERE.

 

Don’t Be Weinstein Co. 2.0

Mary Lowengard, Institutional Investor, January 8, 2018

Davia Temin, president & CEO of Temin and Co., shares ten simple steps for corporate executives.

1. Sexual harassment is a C-suite and board-level issue. As an ounce of prevention, order an audit of every case currently under investigation and every case that's been reported over the previous five to ten years.

2. Review previously disposed cases under the lens of today's news. Hand over ongoing cases to a law firm for investigation, and secure crisis management counseling.

3. Any time it is determined that real offenses have taken place, fire the perpetrator immediately — or put him on leave, then fire him. Act swiftly and definitively. Actions speak louder than words. [...read more]

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Nightmare on Investor Relations Street

Mary Lowengard, Institutional Investor, January 5, 2018

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A specter is haunting corporate America: sexual harassment. Forget being miffed over MiFID II, daunted by data security, or panicked over product liability. The next Big Crisis that will be keeping investor relations officers awake at night is sexual harassment, and it's coming fast.

As sexual harassment has been prevalent in corporate life for decades, why would it surface now? It all started with Bill — Cosby, that is — says crisis management consultant Davia Temin, founder and head of Temin and Co. The Cosby affair demonstrated the powerful effect of victims breaking out of their "silos of silence and shame,: despite the risk of wrecking their careers. She describes what's coming for corporate America as a "tsunami," fortified by years of suffering and accelerated by social media. [...read more]

Dying on the job: CEOs’ ages forces investors to reckon with succession

Jeff Green, The Financial Post, January 2, 2018

The same-day deaths of two aging chief executive officers show why some investors and governance experts want companies to disclose more about succession plans and the health of their executives.

CSX Corp.'s Hunter Harrison, 73, died Dec. 16, a day after news of his medical leave pushed the railroad's shares down the most in six years. M&T Bank Corp. said Robert Wilmers passed away "suddenly and unexpectedly" at age 83 — just months after the death of his own heir apparent.

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These earthly departures underscore the privacy, governance and legal issues entangled in one fact of shifting demographics: As the U.S. population ages, so too do corporate chieftains. The average age of a CEO has risen four per cent in the past decade and there has been at least one health-related change atop Standard & Poor's 500 Index companies in each of the past three years, according to executive recruiter Spencer Stuart.

"What we're facing is the new paradigm of work," said Davia Temin, head of the New York-based crisis-management firm Temin & Co. "When people are in the zone of what they love to do, most of them are not going to voluntarily give that up. That means that people will work later, and maybe with a little bit more of an illusion that death won't apply to them." [...read more]

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