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Temin and Co.

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"Gynecologist’s Actions Bring Down USC’s President" 

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"Harassment Claims Cost Wynn Resorts its Leader" 

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"NBC News Faces Questions After Lauer Firing" 

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"Equifax Hit With Massive Reputation Breach" 

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"Fujifilm Addresses Accounting Problems" 

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"Hacked Twitter Account Gives McDonald’s Indigestion" 

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"Qualcomm Chips Away at South Korea Probe" 

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"Tyson Finds Itself in Game of Reputation Chicken" 

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"Delta Grounded After Computer Crash" 

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"Signet Confronts Diamond Debacles" 

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"NFL Goes for Knockout Against New York Times" 

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"OSI Fights Back In China" 

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"Tesla Slams the Brakes on Seat Belt Problem" 

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"United Airlines Faces Turbulence Amid Federal Probe" 

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 "Accounting Problems Hobble Toshiba" 

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 "Kiss-and-Tell Fears After Adult Friend Finder Breach" 

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"Ice Cream Recall Snags Blue Bell" 

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"Williams, NBC Between Iraq and a Hard Place" 

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"Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut" 

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"How Well Did Tesco Account for Itself?" 

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In the News

Managing Crisis in an Era of Disruption

Business for America, November 16, 2017

As a crisis strategist, Davia Temin deals with the thorniest issues of the day, from global politics and instability, to corporate board and C-suite priorities and intrigue, to the crises faced by our nation’s top colleges and universities. She often shares her insights as a Forbes.com columnist on “Reputation Matters.” On the call with Business for America (formerly DisruptDC), she discussed all these topics and answered questions about how to lead with integrity and efficacy through whatever crisis comes your way. [...read more]

 

Halperin Scandal Adds to List of Harassment Concerns

Richard Quest, Quest Means Business, CNN Money, October 26, 2017

Quest-CNN-10-26-17

Five women have come forward with harassment claims against the journalist, Mark Halperin, relating to his time at ABC news. Halperin says he's now stepping back from his role at MSNBC and NBC news. And while he denies some of the allegations, he does say he's deeply sorry.

What is a company supposed to do when there are people like President H. W. Bush, who believed it was OK to pat a woman's posterior. You've got Halperin, who asked people out on dates and then tried to kiss them, allegedly. Where are we going with this?

"Well, I think from time immemorial, we're going to something that has been almost always true. And we' re reaching a tipping point right now where it's no longer acceptable. People are starting to talk about it more. Women are telling their stories more. And it starts with one person' s personal narrative."

But the company itself…what is the company supposed to do?

"First of all, they've already got the stuff on the books. They've got their regulations on the books. They haven't ever enforced them in the way that most women would like to see it. So, what can companies, if the companies are getting serious about this, because of social media, because of 24-hour news shows, what now they need to do are carrots, sticks, and nudges. This is to change behavior. Carrots, sticks, nudges." [...read more]

To watch the interview, CLICK HERE.

Johnson Makes Rare Speech as Fidelity Deals With Harassment

Charles Stein, Laura Colby and Miles Weiss, Bloomberg, October 24, 2017

Fidelity Investments' Abigail Johnson took center stage on Tuesday and counseled money managers gathering in Washington about charting their future in the digital world. But the chief executive, a featured speaker at one of the industry's biggest conferences, is also struggling with a stubborn legacy of the past: the treatment of women in the world of finance.

Over the last two months, Fidelity, one of the largest investment companies, has dismissed two portfolio managers -- one over allegations of inappropriate sexual comments and another over claims of sexually harassing a female junior employee.

Fidelity and other money managers may face a flood of complaints "now that the lid is off," said Davia Temin, president and CEO of Temin & Co., a New York based crisis-management company.

Going forward, Johnson has to continue to "set the tone" that the organization will take every case that comes to light seriously and emphasize there's also a business case for doing so, said Temin. While Fidelity is a closely held company without public shareholders, its customer base cares about these issues, she said. Some public pension funds already demand that women be included on teams that manage their money. [...read more]

Faber, Weinstein Put Boards on Notice: You’re the Adults Now

Jeff Green and Jordyn Holman, Bloomberg, October 17, 2017

Corporate directors should now be on notice: bad behavior isn't so easily swept under the rug. As a parade of executives has been outed as sexist, racist or both, boards have been called on to set -- and enforce -- standards of decent behavior.

On Tuesday, veteran investor and ubiquitous pundit Marc Faber agreed to leave the boards of three companies after he published racist commentary in his subscription newsletter. The week before, five Weinstein Co. directors quit in the wake of revelations about Harvey Weinstein and his history of alleged sexual assault and harassment made public by the New York Times and the New Yorker.

At this point, "CEOs and boards have to be the adults in the room," said Davia Temin, head of the New York-based crisis-management firm Temin & Co. "Boards' voices are getting strengthened, to some degree, because of the need of a counterpoint." [...read more]

How to Handle a PR Crisis a Lot Better Than Equifax

Leigh Anderson, Lifehacker, September 21, 2017

The Equifax data breach, in which 143 million accounts were compromised and which might have years-long consequences for consumers, was historic in its scope and potential for damage. But it's also notable for how extraordinarily badly the company, at least from a public-relations standpoint, handled the fallout.

"It was a model of the worst case imaginable," says Davia Temin, president and CEO of Temin and Company, a crisis and reputation-management firm. If you’re running a business, crises are inevitable.

It’s how you handle them that will determine whether you’ll move on relatively unscathed—or whether you’ll lose customers or even be forced out of business entirely. In this article, the author spoke to a couple of experts in the field about how they would have handled the Equifax breach better. [...read more]

Crisis of the Week: Equifax Hit With Massive Reputation Breach

Ben DiPietro, The Wall Street Journal's Risk & Compliance Journal, September 19, 2017

The hack of personal information of around 143 million people has put credit-monitoring service Equifax Inc. in the crisis bullseye. Hackers swiped Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and driver's license numbers, leaving consumers trying to figure out their next moves—and unhappy with how Equifax was handling the situation. 

Equifax issued a statement on Sept. 7 notifying the public about the breach—weeks after it said it first learned of the incursion. It issued 'updates' on Sept. 8, Sept. 11, Sept. 13, Sept. 14 and Sept. 15, the last one announcing the retirements of its chief information officer and chief security officer. Bloomberg reported three executives sold stock days after the company learned of the breach but NPR reported Equifax said in a statement not posted on its website the executives "had no knowledge that an intrusion had occurred at the time they sold their shares." The company's chief executive, Robert F. Smith, said the incident is "the most humbling moment in our 118-year history" and promised changes.

The experts evaluate how well Equifax has handled its crisis communications.

"Equifax’s public response to its breach affecting 143 million Americans remains one of the worst yet, serving only to exacerbate the crisis–and the company took over a month to plan it," said Davia Temin. "It made pretty much every crisis communications gaffe in the book, systematically destroying public trust with every move." [...read more]

President Trump Cedes Moral Leadership To Big Business

Alexander C. Kaufman, The Huffington Post, August 19, 2017

A deadly attack by an avowed white supremacist shocked the nation. The president's response came swiftly, and triggered raw emotion. Despite a sometimes strained relationship with the White House, corporate board rooms stayed silent, spared the need to weigh in.

That was 2015.

This week, chief executives at some of the country's biggest companies tossed out usual protocols and disavowed the sitting commander-in-chief after President Donald Trump refused to single out the white supremacists and neo-Nazis who rallied in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend.

Of course, distance from the leader of the ruling political party won't cost executives their jobs like it might lawmakers facing reelection in an era of hyper partisanship. At a particularly circus-like time in politics, this gives companies the ability to "become the adults in the room," said Davia Temin, a management coach and reputation consultant who worked with some of the companies whose leaders resigned from Trump's councils this week.

"Business has a planning and strategic horizon that is further out than four years or eight years or 12 years," she told HuffPost. "They can actually have a counterpoint and be the counterbalance to the short governance by tweet." [...read more]

Davia Temin Says Trump Had No Choice But to End Councils

Scarlet Fu and Julie Hyman, Bloomberg, August 16, 2017

In today's "Walk the Talk," Davia Temin, head of the crisis-management firm Temin & Co., reacts to President Donald Trump's decision to disband two advisory groups of U.S. business leaders. She speaks with Bloomberg's Scarlet Fu and Julie Hyman on "Bloomberg Markets."

To watch the interview on Bloomberg, CLICK HERE.

CEOs Rethink Alliances With White House

Vanessa Fuhrmans, The Wall Street Journal, August 15, 2017

President Donald Trump's response to the weekend violence in Charlottesville, Va., has sparked a new round of soul-searching in U.S. corporate boardrooms over whether they should keep working closely with the White House.

On Tuesday, the number of members who have withdrawn from a White House advisory council grew to five, and executives including Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Chief Executive Doug McMillon criticized the president's initial unwillingness to specifically denounce the racist hate groups that rallied in Charlottesville over the weekend.

The fallout is testing already-tense relations between the White House and corporate executives, many of whom face new pressures from employees, consumers and activists to take stands on social and political issues. At times, those issues have put them in direct opposition with a president whose pro-business agenda they are also seeking to shape.

"This is one of the toughest times for the consciences of corporate boards and corporate CEOs,'' said Davia Temin, head of Temin & Co., a reputation and crisis-management consultancy. Ms. Temin said she expects more leaders to resign their advisory posts. [...read more]

Three More CEOs Turn Backs on Trump as Merck, Intel Quit Counci

Jeff Green and Jared S. Hopkins, Bloomberg, August 15, 2017

Could America's first CEO president lose America's CEOs?

It was a question that came to the fore again Monday when first Merck & Co.'s Kenneth Frazier, then Under Armour Inc.'s Kevin Plank and Intel Corp.'s Brian Krzanich stepped down from a White House business group set up to advise Donald Trump.

While none mentioned the president, Frazier, one of the country's most-prominent black chief executive officers, quit the council as Trump was being assailed for failing to quickly condemn white supremacists for deadly violence at a rally Saturday in Charlottesville, Virginia. Frazier said he was acting on a "matter of personal conscience."

Frazier and his compatriots joined the ranks of Elon Musk of Tesla Inc., Bob Iger of Walt Disney Co. and Travis Kalanick of Uber Technologies Inc. -- executives who walked away from business panels Trump touted, taking the unusual steps of publicly distancing themselves from a sitting president.

Who's next? That's the big debate, said Davia Temin, head of the New York-based crisis-management firm Temin & Co. "This conversation is viral in boardrooms right now." [...read more]

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