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Temin and Co.

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"Gynecologist’s Actions Bring Down USC’s President" 

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"Harassment Claims Cost Wynn Resorts its Leader" 

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"NBC News Faces Questions After Lauer Firing" 

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"Equifax Hit With Massive Reputation Breach" 

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"Fujifilm Addresses Accounting Problems" 

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"Hacked Twitter Account Gives McDonald’s Indigestion" 

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"Qualcomm Chips Away at South Korea Probe" 

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"Tyson Finds Itself in Game of Reputation Chicken" 

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"Delta Grounded After Computer Crash" 

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"Signet Confronts Diamond Debacles" 

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"NFL Goes for Knockout Against New York Times" 

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"OSI Fights Back In China" 

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"Tesla Slams the Brakes on Seat Belt Problem" 

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"United Airlines Faces Turbulence Amid Federal Probe" 

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 "Accounting Problems Hobble Toshiba" 

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 "Kiss-and-Tell Fears After Adult Friend Finder Breach" 

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"Ice Cream Recall Snags Blue Bell" 

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"Williams, NBC Between Iraq and a Hard Place" 

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"Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut" 

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"How Well Did Tesco Account for Itself?" 

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In the News

Investor Focus Shifts to Gender Pay Equity

Lindsay Frost, Agenda, January 29, 2018

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The World Economic Forum kicked off last week in Davos, Switzerland, bringing together corporate heads and political titans to discuss, among other things, how the "Me Too" movement, pressure to provide equal opportunities for women and regulations in the U.S. and abroad are driving gender pay equity further into the spotlight.

"As discussions around women and the workplace and having a harassment-free, gender-neutral kind of presence in the workplace at the highest level gets raised over and over again, hopefully every time some fixes come with that," says Davia Temin, CEO of strategy and communications consulting firm Temin and Company. "Extinguishing sexual harassment in organizations is here to stay, so with that comes a host of other issues [being addressed] — pay being one of them." [...read more]

How boards and CEOs can prevent workplace sexual harassment

Jon Erlichman, BNN, January 24, 2018

Davia Temin, president and CEO of Temin and Company, joined BNN's Business Day AM to discuss how companies can fix and prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.

To watch the interview on BNN, CLICK HERE.

 

Don’t Be Weinstein Co. 2.0

Mary Lowengard, Institutional Investor, January 8, 2018

Davia Temin, president & CEO of Temin and Co., shares ten simple steps for corporate executives.

1. Sexual harassment is a C-suite and board-level issue. As an ounce of prevention, order an audit of every case currently under investigation and every case that's been reported over the previous five to ten years.

2. Review previously disposed cases under the lens of today's news. Hand over ongoing cases to a law firm for investigation, and secure crisis management counseling.

3. Any time it is determined that real offenses have taken place, fire the perpetrator immediately — or put him on leave, then fire him. Act swiftly and definitively. Actions speak louder than words. [...read more]

Read more...

Nightmare on Investor Relations Street

Mary Lowengard, Institutional Investor, January 5, 2018

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A specter is haunting corporate America: sexual harassment. Forget being miffed over MiFID II, daunted by data security, or panicked over product liability. The next Big Crisis that will be keeping investor relations officers awake at night is sexual harassment, and it's coming fast.

As sexual harassment has been prevalent in corporate life for decades, why would it surface now? It all started with Bill — Cosby, that is — says crisis management consultant Davia Temin, founder and head of Temin and Co. The Cosby affair demonstrated the powerful effect of victims breaking out of their "silos of silence and shame,: despite the risk of wrecking their careers. She describes what's coming for corporate America as a "tsunami," fortified by years of suffering and accelerated by social media. [...read more]

Dying on the job: CEOs’ ages forces investors to reckon with succession

Jeff Green, The Financial Post, January 2, 2018

The same-day deaths of two aging chief executive officers show why some investors and governance experts want companies to disclose more about succession plans and the health of their executives.

CSX Corp.'s Hunter Harrison, 73, died Dec. 16, a day after news of his medical leave pushed the railroad's shares down the most in six years. M&T Bank Corp. said Robert Wilmers passed away "suddenly and unexpectedly" at age 83 — just months after the death of his own heir apparent.

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These earthly departures underscore the privacy, governance and legal issues entangled in one fact of shifting demographics: As the U.S. population ages, so too do corporate chieftains. The average age of a CEO has risen four per cent in the past decade and there has been at least one health-related change atop Standard & Poor's 500 Index companies in each of the past three years, according to executive recruiter Spencer Stuart.

"What we're facing is the new paradigm of work," said Davia Temin, head of the New York-based crisis-management firm Temin & Co. "When people are in the zone of what they love to do, most of them are not going to voluntarily give that up. That means that people will work later, and maybe with a little bit more of an illusion that death won't apply to them." [...read more]

CEOs’ Advancing Age Forces Investors to Reckon With Succession

Jeff Green, Bloomberg, December 19, 2017

The same-day deaths of two aging chief executive officers -- industry icons in railroading and banking -- show why some investors and governance experts want companies to disclose more about succession plans and the health of their executives.

CSX Corp.'s Hunter Harrison, 73, died Saturday, one day after news of his medical leave pushed the railroad's shares down the most in six years. M&T Bank Corp. said Robert Wilmers passed away "suddenly and unexpectedly" at age 83 -- just months after the death of his own heir apparent.

These earthly departures underscore the privacy, governance and legal issues entangled in one fact of shifting demographics: As the U.S. population ages, so too do the chieftains of Corporate America.

"What we're facing is the new paradigm of work," said Davia Temin, head of the New York-based crisis-management firm Temin & Co. "When people are in the zone of what they love to do, most of them are not going to voluntarily give that up. That means that people will work later, and maybe with a little bit more of an illusion that death won't apply to them." [...read more]

Liberty Tax Sex Scandal Draws Investor Suit Targeting Hewitt

Jef Feeley and Anders Melin, Bloomberg, December 13, 2017

Some Liberty Tax Inc. investors have lost patience with founder John Hewitt. A pension fund is asking a judge to order Hewitt to relinquish his controlling stake in the national tax-preparation service after an internal review found that while running the company, he had sex in his office and hired relatives of female employees with whom he'd had romantic relationships.

The Liberty case is just the latest in a string of firings of prominent men as sexual harassment accusations shake public figures in fields as diverse as the media, the U.S. Congress and restaurant chains. Even company founders such as Uber’s Travis Kalanick and the Weinstein Co.’s Harvey Weinstein have lost their jobs following harassment allegations.

Company boards are increasingly being drawn into the fray. "This is opening up a whole new area of liability for corporations,'' said Davia Temin, president and CEO of Temin & Co., a New York-based crisis management company. "They have to seriously look at the risks this behavior poses to the company.'' [...read more]

Crisis of the Week: NBC News Faces Questions After Lauer Firing

Ben DiPietro, The Wall Street Journal's Risk & Compliance Journal, December 12, 2017

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NBC News is in crisis after it fired longtime "Today" show anchor Matt Lauer after he was accused of sexual misconduct. The move came hours before the magazine Variety published a story detailing some of Mr. Lauer's alleged actions with female staffers. The day after the firing, two more women came forward to accuse Mr. Lauer, who apologized and said: "Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterized, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed."

NBC News President Andy Lack issued a statement on Nov. 29, saying the "detailed complaint" against Mr. Lauer was a "clear violation of our company's standards." He said the priority is to create a workplace environment where everyone feels safe, adding "any actions that run counter to our core values are met with consequences, no matter who the offender." At the time of the firing, the network said it didn't know of any complaints against Mr. Lauer during his time at NBC, only to later say no complaints had been made to "current management." Mr. Lack sent a memo to staff on Dec. 1, saying the company is reviewing Mr. Lauer's prior behavior and that it needs to "build a culture of greater transparency, openness and respect."

The experts break down how well NBC News handled this crisis from a communications standpoint.

"NBC's handling of the Matt Lauer affair is a fascinating example of the almost-triumph of alt-fact and spin," said Davia Temin. "In the end, though, it turned out to be a serious breach of public trust." [...read more]

Met Opera Grapples With Sex Accusations Amid Financial Challenges

Jennifer Smith, The Wall Street Journal, December 4, 2017

The Metropolitan Opera already was struggling to get its financial house in order when the bombshell hit: Multiple allegations of sexual abuse by famed conductor James Levine, who served as the company's music director for four decades.

Those accusations, which led the Met this past weekend to suspend its relationship with Mr. Levine and launch an internal probe, could complicate its funding woes.

"The right road is to get ahead of it," said Davia Temin, chief executive of Temin and Company Inc., a reputation and crisis-management consultancy. "You have to demonstrate, from the time you start hearing of a report...that you are taking the moral high ground." [...read more]

NBC Fires Matt Lauer for "Inappropriate Behavior"

Richard Quest, Quest Means Business, CNN Money, November 29, 2017

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U.S. TV anchor, Matt Lauer, was fired by NBC news after a complaint about inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace.

Forget the drawn-out Harvey Weinstein or Kevin Spacey. With Matt Lauer, it all happened very quickly. The complaint was filed against Lauer on Monday. The investigation took place on Tuesday. And he was fired last night. The speed shows how seriously companies are now taking sexual harassment claims.

"It's about time. Finally...through some conglomeration of social media, more women around, finally it is being taken seriously, and not a wink, wink, nod, nod," said Davia Temin.

"I think that you can probably assume from the quickness with which Matt Lauer was fired that there was some real proof there. We don't know what they saw. They're not sharing everything. It's not total transparency. Nor should it be. But there's probably an awful lot of proof there. So, what I would say to you is, it's not time yet. It's not time for the pushback when we're still just starting to hear what the real problem is."

"All I can say is, it's about time that they start looking the right way now. Let's not castigate them for that yet." [...read more]

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