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Temin and Co.

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"Ice Cream Recall Snags Blue Bell" 

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In the News-The Media

#MeToo and the Weinstein verdict: What now for working women?

Radmilla Suleymanova, Al Jazeera, February 29, 2020

AlJazeera 2-29-20

Harvey Weinstein, the once all-powerful Hollywood mogul making and breaking women's careers, now faces up to 29 years behind bars after being convicted this week of sexual assault and third-degree rape. Dozens of women who accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct, predatory behavior and rape have yet to have their day in court. Still Monday's verdict serves as a turning point in a scandal that blew the lid off of sexual harassment in US workplaces and propelled the #MeToo movement to a global stage.

#MeToo put on blast predatory gatekeepers in media, sports and entertainment by bypassing traditional streams of reporting sexual misconduct and harassment. It inspired millions of women to share their own experiences on social media.

While the movement ignited an international conversation, gender experts say the Weinstein scandal and conviction shows just how much work needs to be done to change cultural norms that have for decades brushed off sexual harassment allegations and the women who voice them.

Public awareness is spreading though. UN Women estimates that between 2016 and 2019 #MeToo and its global sister hashtags made over 36 million social media impressions.

And while the number of sexual harassment allegations has fallen compared with when Weinstein was first accused, it is still higher than before #MeToo began, according to crisis and reputation strategy firm Temin & Co.

"#MeToo 2.0" should at least give women the tools to deal with abuse, the company's founder Davia Temin told Al Jazeera. "Women, when it happens, document it, tell your friends, or a lawyer because when allegations come to light you are going to be asked for proof," Temin added. [...read more]

Harvey Weinstein Is Convicted of Rape in Case That Sparked #MeToo

Patricia Hurtado and Rebecca Greenfield, Bloomberg, February 24, 2020

Bloomberg 2-24-20

Harvey Weinstein was convicted of rape and a criminal sexual act, more than two years after allegations against the former Hollywood power broker sparked the #MeToo movement.

Weinstein faces a five- to 25-year sentence for the criminal sexual act and as long as four years on a third-degree rape count. He was acquitted of rape in the first degree and charges of predatory sexual assault that could have resulted in a life sentence.

The 67-year-old movie producer, who is due to be sentenced on March 11 and plans to appeal, heard the verdict without expressing any emotion in an otherwise silent courtroom -- though he then turned to his lawyers and said, "But I'm innocent, I'm innocent, I'm innocent. How can this happen in America?" one of them said after court.

Since the allegations against Weinstein were first widely reported, some 1,400 powerful people have been publicly accused of harassment, abuse or assault, according to Temin, the crisis consultants. Many suffered professional consequences of one kind or another. The crisis consultancy Temin & Co. puts the current number of Weinstein accusers at 111. [...read more]

The Cost of MeToo Claims

Stephanie Forshee, Agenda, January 17, 2020

Agenda-Logo-FT

When supermodel Kate Upton went public two years ago and accused Guess co-founder Paul Marciano of groping her breasts — allegedly without her consent — word spread fast. Guess Inc. had been trading at $18.37 per share just a day earlier, but its stock dropped by 18% upon the news about Marciano, making it the worst trading day in six years as the company lost $250 million in value.

Due to the reputational damage brought by a MeToo claim, plus the piling on of shareholder lawsuits alleging the information was material for investors, analysts and executives have found themselves rethinking how to calculate the impact of these allegations on businesses.

Since MeToo received a platform in recent years, 285 companies have been hit with claims — 199 private companies and 86 public companies — according to Temin & Co., which tracks sexual misconduct allegations. Davia Temin, CEO of the risk and reputation firm, says, "Instead of putting their head in the sand not wanting to know, the best boards are saying, 'We do want to know. We want to know before any problem arises.'" [...read more] (subscription required)

The Ghosn Brand Is Broken. These Spin Doctors Say How to Fix It

David Heller, Corinne Gretler and Jeff Green, Bloomberg, January 12, 2020

Bloomberg-1-12-20-Ghosn Brand

Carlos Ghosn captured the world's attention by being spirited out of Japan in a private jet concealed in a box often used for audio equipment with the help of a security detail led by a former Green Beret. He evaded two trials on charges of financial misconduct. Now he wants to salvage his shattered reputation.

"The world does love an anti-hero," said Davia Temin. "The world does love someone who bucks rules and regulations -- if they're a romantic figure. He has made himself into quite a romantic figure. As tempting as is it to tell his story, more and more, the risk now isn't just that he will sour public support, but that he will do something to make himself a further target." [...read more]

Harvey Weinstein Sex Abuse Settlement Is Not an ‘Oh, Wow’ Number

Jeff Green, Bloomberg, December 11, 2019

Bloomberg 12-11-19 Weinstein Settlement

A tentative $47 million settlement between Harvey Weinstein and dozens of his accusers is "flawed," advocates say, but still an important vindication.

"I think it's just on the margin of being seen as serious, but it certainly does not deliver the message that $100 million would deliver, or $200 million would deliver," said Davia Temin, founder of crisis consultancy Temin and Company, which has tracked more than 1,400 people accused of harassment and other misbehavior since the Weinstein allegations surfaced. "This isn't some 'oh, wow' number."

Considering the scope of the allegations and their impact, Temin and others expected a higher figure. [...read more]

Sexual Harassment Reports in Steep Decline After #MeToo Peak

Jeff Green, Bloomberg, June 17, 2019

6-17-19-Bloomberg-Me-Too-Steep-Decline

Public accusations of corporate misbehavior and harassment have fallen to their lowest level since October 2017, when allegations against movie producer Harvey Weinstein sparked the #MeToo movement.

Twelve complaints generated media coverage in May compared with a peak of 143 last October, according to data compiled by crisis consultant Temin and Co.

There are lots of reasons the pace of allegations has slowed, said Davia Temin. The initial outpouring included decades worth of historical revelations, clearing a kind of backlog. The news cycle has also moved on, and companies have gotten more sophisticated in the way they manage both bad behavior and negative PR. [...read more]

Is Wells Fargo stuck in the denial stage of recovery?

Kate Berry, American Banker, April 7, 2019

American-Banker

Since Wells Fargo's phony-accounts scandal broke in 2016, the bank's public and private reactions have diverged significantly.

After an initial bout of blame directed at the thousands of employees who opened the fake accounts in an effort to meet aggressive sales goals, the bank pivoted to a public position of contrition, saying it was dedicated to fixing its corporate culture to ensure nothing like that could happen again. That line was offered by then-CEO Tim Sloan last month when he testified to Congress, in which he said the bank had made significant progress in atoning for its mistakes.

Yet in private, bank executives and many rank-and-file employees have taken the view that the bank's problems are largely not of its own making and have been overblown by overbearing regulators, scoop-hungry reporters, hostile members of Congress, and a system that has put its actions under an (unfair) microscope.

In short, the bank has appeared to be in denial that it has a problem at all, some argue.

"Denial is one of the hardest issues for a company to address after a crisis," said Davia Temin, president and CEO of management consulting firm Temin and Company. "It's not over just because Wells is ready for it to be over." [...read more]

Jeff Bezos: Extortion and Embarrassing Photos Won’t Distract Me

Spencer Soper and Jeff Green, Bloomberg, February 8, 2019

Bloomberg-Bezos-2-8-19

Jeff Bezos pre-empting the National Enquirer by laying bare embarrassing personal details may have been the easier task. Now the world's wealthiest man needs to convince investors that locking horns with a powerful American media organization won't end up hurting Amazon.com Inc. itself.

Bezos, Amazon's single largest shareholder, stunned the industry Thursday night when he accused the Enquirer of trying to blackmail him, publishing tense exchanges with the magazine that included prurient details of his relationship with former TV anchor Lauren Sanchez. The saga now threatens to snowball, exerting even more pressure on a billionaire who already oversees the biggest online retailer, a space exploration company and a leading national news outlet.

For now, investors have shrugged off news of his personal life as unimportant to the value of the company, which posted revenue of $233 billion last year and a record-breaking holiday season. Now that Bezos has twice jumped in front of embarrassing news, the challenge is in maintaining the perception he can focus on his company's growth.

"Bezos is that extraordinary, and Amazon is that extraordinary, that he can bring down a bully," said Davia Temin, founder of the New York based crisis-consultant Temin and Co. "He's got the courage, and the position as the richest man in the United States, and I think his courage in standing up to the extortion is going to outweigh the details behind the extortion." [...read more]

Les Moonves, The Most Powerful CEO To Face #MeToo, Is Winning. So Far.

Emily Peck, Huffington Post, August 19, 2018

HuffPost-Les-Moonves

It's been more than three weeks since The New Yorker published Ronan Farrow's damning article on Les Moonves, the longtime chief executive of CBS. The allegations were horrifying.

For all the hype about how the Me Too movement is taking down powerful men, nearly a third of the most high-profile executives and celebrities accused of misconduct since 2015 haven't lost their jobs, according to data compiled by New York crisis consulting firm Temin & Co.

Temin started tracking this back when women were coming forward with accusations against comedian Bill Cosby, but the movement really gained speed in the fall of 2017, after the Weinstein allegations came to light. In all, the firm says, 483 executives and celebrities have been accused publicly, which it measures by being mentioned in at least seven major publications. Of that number, 144 have not experienced any professional fallout ― yet. That includes Trump, Moonves and Jeff Fager, the "60 Minutes" executive producer. Some may be under investigation.

At least four have already made comebacks, according to Temin. [...read more]

The big picture: #MeToo has exposed hundreds of high-profile people

Haley Britzky, Axios, July 7, 2018

Axios-Big-Picture-MeToo

More than 400 high-profile executives and employees from across the professional spectrum have been brought down by the #MeToo movement in the last 18 months, Bloomberg reports.

The big picture: While #MeToo isn't dominating headlines the way it was last year, the movement has still been at work behind the scenes. Davia Temin, whose firm Temin & Co. conducted the study cited by Bloomberg, said that while the accusation rate "has been slowing ... the percentage of people being fired has increased." [...read more]

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