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Temin and Co.

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"Gynecologist’s Actions Bring Down USC’s President" 

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"Harassment Claims Cost Wynn Resorts its Leader" 

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"NBC News Faces Questions After Lauer Firing" 

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"Equifax Hit With Massive Reputation Breach" 

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"Fujifilm Addresses Accounting Problems" 

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"Hacked Twitter Account Gives McDonald’s Indigestion" 

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"Qualcomm Chips Away at South Korea Probe" 

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"Tyson Finds Itself in Game of Reputation Chicken" 

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"Delta Grounded After Computer Crash" 

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"Signet Confronts Diamond Debacles" 

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"NFL Goes for Knockout Against New York Times" 

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"OSI Fights Back In China" 

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"Tesla Slams the Brakes on Seat Belt Problem" 

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"United Airlines Faces Turbulence Amid Federal Probe" 

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 "Accounting Problems Hobble Toshiba" 

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 "Kiss-and-Tell Fears After Adult Friend Finder Breach" 

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"Ice Cream Recall Snags Blue Bell" 

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"Williams, NBC Between Iraq and a Hard Place" 

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"Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut" 

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"How Well Did Tesco Account for Itself?" 

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In the News-The Media

Les Moonves, The Most Powerful CEO To Face #MeToo, Is Winning. So Far.

Emily Peck, Huffington Post, August 19, 2018

HuffPost-Les-Moonves

It's been more than three weeks since The New Yorker published Ronan Farrow's damning article on Les Moonves, the longtime chief executive of CBS. The allegations were horrifying.

For all the hype about how the Me Too movement is taking down powerful men, nearly a third of the most high-profile executives and celebrities accused of misconduct since 2015 haven't lost their jobs, according to data compiled by New York crisis consulting firm Temin & Co.

Temin started tracking this back when women were coming forward with accusations against comedian Bill Cosby, but the movement really gained speed in the fall of 2017, after the Weinstein allegations came to light. In all, the firm says, 483 executives and celebrities have been accused publicly, which it measures by being mentioned in at least seven major publications. Of that number, 144 have not experienced any professional fallout ― yet. That includes Trump, Moonves and Jeff Fager, the "60 Minutes" executive producer. Some may be under investigation.

At least four have already made comebacks, according to Temin. [...read more]

The big picture: #MeToo has exposed hundreds of high-profile people

Haley Britzky, Axios, July 7, 2018

Axios-Big-Picture-MeToo

More than 400 high-profile executives and employees from across the professional spectrum have been brought down by the #MeToo movement in the last 18 months, Bloomberg reports.

The big picture: While #MeToo isn't dominating headlines the way it was last year, the movement has still been at work behind the scenes. Davia Temin, whose firm Temin & Co. conducted the study cited by Bloomberg, said that while the accusation rate "has been slowing ... the percentage of people being fired has increased." [...read more]

Hundreds of Business Leaders Face Accusations in #MeToo Movement

NACD Weekend Reader, June 30, 2018

NACD-Weekend-Reader

A new reports finds the #MeToo movement over the last 18 months has opened the door to allegations against 417 high-profile employees and corporate executives, Bloomberg reports. The majority of those individuals are business leaders and executives—410 of them are men—from a wide array of industries, according to the report by crisis consulting firm Temin & Co.

Many of the allegations stem from incidents that happened years ago, but have only recently come to light. And while the rate of accusations has slowed recently, the percentage of individuals fired has increased.

"It started to become a tsunami, certainly after [Harvey] Weinstein, and it sparked other stories in the same industry and then across all industries," said Davia Temin, president and CEO of Temin & Co. "I think it's settled into a new plateau, but it is certainly higher than we've ever had before."

Of the 417 high-profile individuals who were accused of issues related to sexual harassment, racial insensitivity, or other misconduct, 193 were fired, and 122 were either suspended, put on leave, or are having their actions investigated. [...read more]

#MeToo Snares More Than 400 High-Profile People

Jeff Green, Bloomberg, June 25, 2018

Bloomberg-6-25-Me-Too-Snares-More-Than-400

At least 414 high-profile executives and employees across fields and industries have been outed by the #MeToo Movement in 18 months, according to data collected by a New York-based crisis consulting firm.

The study looked at national news articles that singled out people for sexual harassment or other similar misdeeds, said Davia Temin, whose firm Temin & Co. did the research. Individuals with at least seven separate, national mentions were included. That includes celebrities like Bill Cosby and Louis CK, but the vast majority are corporate executives and business leaders like Intel CEO Brian Krzanich, who resigned late last week after revelations of an affair with an employee. [...read more]

Hawaii’s Investment Chief Got Fired. Then the Gossip Started.

Leanna Orr, Institutional Investor, April 23, 2018

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Firing the chief investment officer was the final order of business at the Hawaii pension board's regular meeting on February 12. CIO Vijoy Chattergy was blindsided, insiders say. After seven years with the organization, Chattergy was told by his bosses that Monday that he was done, effective immediately.

When the news broke, people were just asking, 'What happened? What did he do?'" By the time Chattergy's ouster was hot industry gossip coast to coast — that is, within days — it was no longer a mystery. The narrative took hold that Chattergy had blown up Hawaii's pension fund with a risky bet turned bad, then lost his job over it.

ERS executive director Thomas Williams initially refused to discuss the situation, though ultimately he notified the staff by email. Williams said what an organization's leader should after executive upheaval, according to crisis PR consultant Davia Temin. He just did it a month too late.

"People are let go all the time," says Temin, who reviewed the timeline and the documents associated with Chattergy's ouster. "Whether the reasons are pretty benign or more egregious, the best practice is to act with the most elegance possible. And that means you allow someone their dignity as they leave," she notes. "You don't malign them or allow them to be maligned by doing and saying nothing, by keeping it a mystery. People will fill in that huge void with something far worse than reality — it's human nature." [...read more]

America's Leadership Crisis: Davia Temin

Richard Davies, How Do We Fix It?, March 30, 2018

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With turmoil and never-ending drama in the White House, and record numbers of departures from top levels of the Trump Administration, it is safe to say that America is facing a leadership crisis.

This episode's guest, Davia Temin, looks at how leaders can avoid the mistakes and embarrassment that could ruin their reputation, lead to their downfall and cause their employees and associates great harm.

She speaks from a place of deep experience and passion about the crucial importance of ethics, honesty and diversity, as well as the need for leaders to communicate quickly and clearly, especially in times of crisis. We learn about the do's and don'ts of crisis communications as well as the benefits of coaching and training. [...read more]

Zuckerberg built an instant gratification machine — but took his time addressing the trouble it’s caused

Jena McGregor, The Washington Post, March 22, 2018

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After Mark Zuckerberg broke his silence Wednesday about the mushrooming Cambridge Analytica scandal, it's hard to argue the Facebook founder and CEO has said too little.

Zuckerberg wrote a 935-word Facebook post Wednesday where he said "we have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can't then we don't deserve to serve you," outlining steps the company was taking following blockbuster reports about user data being scraped without their consent. He sat for interviews with the New York Times, Wired, tech publication Recode and a rare on-camera interview with CNN.

But despite the Facebook post and parade of media interviews, crisis experts argue Zuckerberg's personal response came much too late.

"The higher the stakes, the quicker you want to plant your flag," said Davia Temin. "And these stakes are arguably the highest of any crisis we've seen in a long time for a corporation." [...read more]

3 Important Lessons From Facebook's Deepening PR Crisis

Ari Zoldan, Inc., March 22, 2018

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Facebook hasn't exactly been sitting pretty in the court of public opinion, even if many who were holding its feet to the fire over unscrupulous "fake news" stories and Russian-bought political advertisements were still using the social media platform. But the storm was perhaps breaking, and brighter skies -- or at least neutral ground -- seemed on the horizon.

Then Cambridge Analytica happened.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg released a statement that amounted to an acceptance of responsibility, and promised that the company would be making changes to its data security policies.

However, the response came four days after news broke of the scandal.

"In today's world, I believe you have 15 minutes to address some kind of crisis when it emerges over social media," Davia Temin told MarketWatch. Customers don't like to be left in the dark. A quick repsonse is key to rebounding. [...read more]

Crisis of the Week: NBC News Faces Questions After Lauer Firing

Ben DiPietro, The Wall Street Journal's Risk & Compliance Journal, December 12, 2017

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NBC News is in crisis after it fired longtime "Today" show anchor Matt Lauer after he was accused of sexual misconduct. The move came hours before the magazine Variety published a story detailing some of Mr. Lauer's alleged actions with female staffers. The day after the firing, two more women came forward to accuse Mr. Lauer, who apologized and said: "Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterized, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed."

NBC News President Andy Lack issued a statement on Nov. 29, saying the "detailed complaint" against Mr. Lauer was a "clear violation of our company's standards." He said the priority is to create a workplace environment where everyone feels safe, adding "any actions that run counter to our core values are met with consequences, no matter who the offender." At the time of the firing, the network said it didn't know of any complaints against Mr. Lauer during his time at NBC, only to later say no complaints had been made to "current management." Mr. Lack sent a memo to staff on Dec. 1, saying the company is reviewing Mr. Lauer's prior behavior and that it needs to "build a culture of greater transparency, openness and respect."

The experts break down how well NBC News handled this crisis from a communications standpoint.

"NBC's handling of the Matt Lauer affair is a fascinating example of the almost-triumph of alt-fact and spin," said Davia Temin. "In the end, though, it turned out to be a serious breach of public trust." [...read more]

NBC Fires Matt Lauer for "Inappropriate Behavior"

Richard Quest, Quest Means Business, CNN Money, November 29, 2017

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U.S. TV anchor, Matt Lauer, was fired by NBC news after a complaint about inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace.

Forget the drawn-out Harvey Weinstein or Kevin Spacey. With Matt Lauer, it all happened very quickly. The complaint was filed against Lauer on Monday. The investigation took place on Tuesday. And he was fired last night. The speed shows how seriously companies are now taking sexual harassment claims.

"It's about time. Finally...through some conglomeration of social media, more women around, finally it is being taken seriously, and not a wink, wink, nod, nod," said Davia Temin.

"I think that you can probably assume from the quickness with which Matt Lauer was fired that there was some real proof there. We don't know what they saw. They're not sharing everything. It's not total transparency. Nor should it be. But there's probably an awful lot of proof there. So, what I would say to you is, it's not time yet. It's not time for the pushback when we're still just starting to hear what the real problem is."

"All I can say is, it's about time that they start looking the right way now. Let's not castigate them for that yet." [...read more]

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